Authors Posts by Mary Rupert

Mary Rupert

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Patti Winkler presented “Quilts in the Classroom: How Quilts Tie into History," during a presentation today at Grinter Place, 78th and K-32. The Grinter Place Quilters' annual quilt show will continue Sunday afternoon. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Patti Winkler presented “Quilts in the Classroom: How Quilts Tie into History,” during a presentation today at Grinter Place, 78th and K-32. The Grinter Place Quilters’ annual quilt show will continue Sunday afternoon. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Quilts of all sorts — traditional and modern — are on display this weekend at the Grinter Place Quilters’ 39th annual quilt show.

Today’s quilt show saw a good turnout, according to a member of the Grinter Place Quilters, and included a presentation by Patti Winkler on “Quilts in the Classroom: How Quilts Tie into History.”

Sixty-eight quilts are in the quilt show this year, according to a member of the Grinter Quilters. It has been the best year of recent years for attendance.

Some of the interesting exhibits this year are quilt blocks that have been donated and placed on display.

The quilt show started Friday and continues through Sunday. Grinter Place is near South 78th and K-32 in Kansas City, Kan. Sunday hours of the quilt show are noon to 4 p.m., located in the visitors building.

The show, at the visitors building, is free and open to the public. There is a small admission charge to tour the Grinter Place state historic site.

For more information, call 913-299-0373 or visit kshs.org/grinter_place.

Patti Winkler presented “Quilts in the Classroom: How Quilts Tie into History," during a presentation today at Grinter Place, 78th and K-32. The Grinter Place Quilters' annual quilt show will continue Sunday afternoon. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Patti Winkler presented “Quilts in the Classroom: How Quilts Tie into History,” during a presentation today at Grinter Place, 78th and K-32. The Grinter Place Quilters’ annual quilt show will continue Sunday afternoon. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Joan Daniels was spinning wool into yarn and explaining the process today to a group of visitors at Grinter Place. The yarn is hand-dyed by a woman in the Kansas City area, she explained. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Joan Daniels was spinning wool into yarn and explaining the process today to a group of visitors at Grinter Place. The yarn is hand-dyed by a woman in the Kansas City area, she explained. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Several individual quilt blocks were on display at the Grinter Place Quilters annual quilt show today at 78th and K-32. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Several individual quilt blocks were on display at the Grinter Place Quilters annual quilt show today at 78th and K-32. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Several quilt blocks were donated to the Grinter Place Quilters and placed on display at the annual quilt show today. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Several quilt blocks were donated to the Grinter Place Quilters and placed on display at the annual quilt show today. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

A detail of one of the quilt blocks placed on display at the Grinter Place Quilters annual quilt show. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
A detail of one of the quilt blocks placed on display at the Grinter Place Quilters annual quilt show. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

This is one of the very colorful quilts that are on display at the Grinter Place Quilters annual quilt show. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
This is one of the very colorful quilts that are on display at the Grinter Place Quilters annual quilt show. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Sixty-eight quilts are on display at the annual Grinter Place Quilters show. (Staff photo)
Sixty-eight quilts are on display at the annual Grinter Place Quilters show. (Staff photo)

Several unique quilts are on display at the annual Grinter Place Quilters quilt show. (Staff photo)
Several unique quilts are on display at the annual Grinter Place Quilters quilt show. (Staff photo)

Many quilts are on display at the annual Grinter Place Quilters show. (Staff photo)
Many quilts are on display at the annual Grinter Place Quilters show. (Staff photo)

Window on the West

by Mary Rupert

The Unified Government swearing-in went off well on Thursday night, and the 1st District, at large seat is finally occupied, after two years of being vacant.

The two new commissioners, Melissa Bynum and Harold Johnson Jr., appear to be well-qualified and ready to work on the community’s behalf.

One thing struck me about this swearing-in, though. Although I’m usually asking for more information, I felt there was a little too much information given at the ceremony. Just the facts and issues pertaining to public policy, please.

***

Marty Thoennes, executive director of the Central Avenue Betterment Association, said he feels one of the biggest issues facing the UG Commission will be how to get enough revenue, specifically, the UG’s collection of unpaid property taxes. He says a big chunk of properties have not been current on paying their property taxes, and not much progress has been made on this, although there have been some efforts made at resolving it. The amount the UG collects on its property taxes could make a difference in the projects it has on the drawing board this year.

***

While the state legislators in Topeka could be desperately diving into fountains looking for spare change in the next few weeks, in order to avoid raising all the taxes, while planning to make more cuts to schools and social programs, the news recently at the federal level was that a group of federal employees abroad had been spending money on prostitutes. There has to be some middle ground between the Topeka skinflint philosophy and the federal spendthrifts.

***

Some of us were watching the Unified Government commissioners sworn in last night, and other area residents were watching the Kansas City Royals game on television, from Chicago. The Royals reportedly got into a fight with Chicago over some slights, real or imagined. It seems to me the umpires could do a lot toward solving these problems. If a ball is thrown by a pitcher and hits a player, intentionally or not, just automatically eject the pitcher from that game. If a batter goes after a pitcher or other player, automatically eject that batter from that game. Then see if the number of incidents decreases.

To reach Mary Rupert, editor, email maryr@wyandottepublishing.com.

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Melissa Bynum, left,  took the oath of office for 1st District commissioner, at large on Thursday, April 23, at the Unified Government Commission swearing-in ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Melissa Bynum, left, took the oath of office for 1st District commissioner, at large on Thursday, April 23, at the Unified Government Commission swearing-in ceremony. Judge Kathleen Lynch administered the oath of office. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Harold Johnson Jr., left, was sworn in as 4th District commissioner by Judge Timothy Dupree on Thursday, April 23, at the Unified Government Commission meeting. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Harold Johnson Jr., left, was sworn in as 4th District commissioner by Judge Timothy Dupree on Thursday, April 23, at the Unified Government Commission meeting. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

UG Commissioners take oath of office at City Hall

by Mary Rupert

With the oath of office tonight, the Unified Government 1st District, at large seat finally was filled.

Melissa Bynum was sworn in as the new commissioner in the seat that had gone vacant for two years. Judge Kathleen Lynch administered the oath of office.

“When I asked you for the privilege of serving you in this way, and you granted that to me, it is an honor and a commitment. I intend to work very hard every day to make you the proud, proud Wyandotte County residents that you already are,” said Bynum, who also is the executive director of Shepherd’s Center. “I can’t thank you enough for this opportunity, and I’m excited to get to work.”

Another new face on the UG Commission will be Harold L. Johnson Jr., 4th District.

“The importance of giving oneself for the benefit of the whole has been ingrained in my mindset,” said Johnson, who is the pastor at the Faith Deliverance Family Worship Center. He was sworn in by Judge Timothy Dupree.

“This is the opportunity I have felt drawn to, to be part of serving the community I love, that I have been a part of all my life, and that I have chosen to stay and be a part of,” he said.

He said he was glad to hear about the developments happening in the 3rd District and out west, and wants to see similar things happening in the 4th District.

“I believe that the 4th District is ready for a renaissance,” Johnson said.

Also sworn in were incumbent commissioners, running unopposed, who won another term, Ann Brandau- Murguia, Brian McKiernan and Angela Markley.

McKiernan said, “There is no shortage of potholes and detours on the road to our dreams.”

“But our past does not define us,” said McKiernan, who was sworn in by UG Clerk Bridgette Cobbins. “Our present does not limit the heights to which we can achieve in the next four years. We have the tools, we have the people, we simply need to find in ourselves the strength, the patience, and the perseverance to make our dreams a reality.”

He said he had a dream to make this city and county the one everyone aspires to become.

Murguia was sworn in by Judge Carlos Murguia. In her speech, she thanked her constituents and family.

She mentioned the achievements in the 3rd District for the past two terms, including infrastructure improvements, a new grocery store, a new Walmart neighborhood market, the Startup Village and expansion at the University of Kansas Medical Center.

“Some might say this is a time to kick back. I disagree. I think it’s a time to kick in,” Murguia said. “We want to continue moving the progress forward, and the way to do that is exactly how we have been doing that.”

She said all the work that has been done in the 3rd District is primarily due to the residents in the 3rd District.

Markley mentioned several accomplishments, and mentioned that she attended more than 1,000 community meetings and events. Among the activities of the past term were new sidewalks and lights for Turner, improving the budget process, working on strategic planning and data-driven strategies, graffiti ordinances, neighborhood drainage issues, community garden in Turner, and new strategies on abandoned housing, and several other items.

In four more years, she said the original STAR bonds would be paid off, the U.S. Soccer Training facility will be open, and everyone will know what futsal is. She pictured new housing in the Highland Crest area, new facilities, sidewalks and streets for Oak Grove School, more sidewalks in the Turner area, and Sporting KC will have won a few more championships.

She pledged to work at least as hard in the next four years. She thanked friends, family, staff, coworkers, neighborhood leaders and the community for their support.

Register of Deeds Nancy Burns also took the oath of office, administered by Judge Robert P. Burns. She had run unopposed.

“My goal is customer service,” she said. She added she believes in treating people as they would like to be treated.

Bynum won election April 7, with 5,437 votes to Mark Gilstrap’s 4,151. There were 805 write-in votes. Nathan Barnes had run a write-in campaign.

The UG Commission had been unable to fill the 1st District, at large seat for two years, as it could not reach the required six votes on any of the candidates proposed for the appointment. Bynum had been one of the persons who submitted her name for the appointment, and was one of the names the mayor had proposed to fill the seat, but the deadlock stayed in place.

Alvin Sykes, a human rights activist who attended the swearing-in ceremony, and who had been in favor of a lawsuit to try to get the UG Commission to fill the vacant 1st District at large seat, remarked that it took about two years to fill it, but it was finally done.

Send your news and comments to Wyandotte Daily at news@wyandottepublishing.com.

2nd District Commissioner Brian McKiernan, left, took the oath of office for another term from UG Clerk Bridgette Cobbins. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
2nd District Commissioner Brian McKiernan, left, took the oath of office for another term from UG Clerk Bridgette Cobbins. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

3rd District Commissioner Ann Brandau-Murguia, left, was sworn in by Judge Carlos Murguia on April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
3rd District Commissioner Ann Brandau-Murguia, left, was sworn in by Judge Carlos Murguia on April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

6th District Commissioner Angela Robinson Markley, left, took the oath of office from Judge Carlos Murguia. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
6th District Commissioner Angela Robinson Markley, left, took the oath of office from Judge Carlos Murguia. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Register of Deeds Nancy W. Burns, left, took the oath of office from Judge Robert P. Burns. She was surrounded by her grandchildren. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Register of Deeds Nancy W. Burns, left, took the oath of office from Judge Robert P. Burns. She was surrounded by her grandchildren. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Wyandotte County Sheriff color guard and the Kansas City, Kan., Police color guard and bagpipes presented the colors on April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
The Wyandotte County Sheriff color guard and the Kansas City, Kan., Police color guard and bagpipes presented the colors on April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Bishop L.F. Thuston of the Kansas East Jurisdiction of the Church of God in Christ offered the invocation April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Bishop L.F. Thuston of the Kansas East Jurisdiction of the Church of God in Christ offered the invocation April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Tifani Portley Lott, of the UG clerk's office, sang "God Bless America" at the commission inauguration ceremony April 23. (Staff photo)
Tifani Portley Lott, of the UG clerk’s office, sang “God Bless America” at the commission inauguration ceremony April 23. (Staff photo)

Harold Johnson Jr., left, 4th District commissioner, received a hug after being sworn in on Thursday, April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Harold Johnson Jr., left, 4th District commissioner, received a hug after being sworn in on Thursday, April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Register of Deeds Nancy Burns addressed the audience on April 23 after taking the oath of office. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
Register of Deeds Nancy Burns addressed the audience on April 23 after taking the oath of office. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

A large crowd attended the Unified Government inauguration ceremonies April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
A large crowd attended the Unified Government inauguration ceremonies April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Rev. Mang Sonna, Bethel Neighborhood Center, offered a benediction April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)
The Rev. Mang Sonna, Bethel Neighborhood Center, offered a benediction April 23. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

After the inaugural ceremonies, those attending, including former mayor Carol Marinovich, right, had an opportunity to visit. (Staff photo)
After the inaugural ceremonies, those attending, including former mayor Carol Marinovich, right, had an opportunity to visit. (Staff photo)

A reception was held afterward in the lobby area. (Staff photo)
A reception was held afterward in the lobby area. (Staff photo)

A reception was held afterward in the lobby. (Staff photo)
A reception was held afterward in the lobby. (Staff photo)

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