KC Foodie Park proposal held over for a month

Curtis Peterson, attorney, presented a drawing of the distribution and cold storage facility for the KC Foodie Park proposed at the former Indian Springs mall site in Kansas City, Kansas. He was requesting a change of zone for the project on Monday night at the City Planning Commission. (Staff photo)

The KC Foodie Park application for a change of zone at the Indian Springs site was held over until the Jan. 14 City Planning Commission meeting to resolve issues.

The application went before the City Planning Commission on Monday night. The site is a former mall near 47th and State Avenue.

Among the reasons the application was held over was that the UG is waiting for the master plan to be updated, plus there were some issues to be worked out on where trucks could park, a sidewalk, the color of the building, drains, the possibility of rotating the building, and irrigation for plants in the landscaping.

Curtis Peterson of Polsinelli represented the KC Foodie Park application by Scavuzzo’s, a food service company. A neighborhood meeting on the proposal was held in November. Peterson said they took into consideration what residents said they wanted for the site in a survey done last year.

According to agenda information, it will be a 234,716-square-foot distribution and food service center, also with office and retail buildings. Three restaurants along State Avenue are shown on the plans. Peterson said the north side and south side buildings would be constructed in the first phase of the project. The north side buildings are restaurants along State Avenue. A 26-acre solar park also are part of the plans.

The planning commission asked some questions about the proposal, which is still at a conceptual level. There were concerns about traffic, especially truck traffic at the site.

Peterson said there is a dual process in talking with the UG administrator’s office on issues such as owning or leasing the property. He said Scavuzzo’s hopes to own the property for its own food service distribution building and offices, while individual restaurant sites might be owned by the restaurants that move in there.

Peterson explained the applicant’s reasoning behind each of the issues that were before the planning commission. For example, the color of the building fits in with the energy conservation design that is planned. Also, the landscaping designed for the project uses plants that require little water, and is part of the project’s LEED goal.

He did not present information about the cost of the project or the method of financing at this meeting, as financial issues were not part of the zoning meeting.

No one appeared in opposition to the KC Foodie Park project at the Dec. 10 meeting.

Rob Richardson, UG planning director, said he was very excited about the project and thinks it will be a great asset to the community.

In other action, the planning commission voted 5-2 to approve the Brune Elementary School application including staff stipulations of a sidewalk. The district is building a sidewalk in one area of the project, but is not building a sidewalk in another area that the planning staff is requesting.

A representative of the Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools appeared and told the planning commission that the district did not own the land on which it is being directed to build a sidewalk, and the owner of the land did not want to sell a portion of it for the sidewalk.

Planning staff suggested that the district should condemn the land, but the school district representative said the district had not done any eminent domain projects in the past seven years.

The school district’s representative said the district has decided to bus all students to the Brune school, and there would be no students walking to it.

However, a member of the planning commission said she was concerned about the safety of students without the sidewalk.

The new school at 8833 Waverly Ave. is being built in a neighborhood that does not have sidewalks already. Many of the neighborhoods in the western part of the city were built before annexation, and the county did not require sidewalks at that time.

The Brune school application had previously gone to the UG Commission, which sent it back so that a solution could be worked out at the City Planning Commission level.

For a previous story on the KC Foodie Park, visit http://wyandottedaily.com/kc-foodie-park-at-indian-springs-on-tonights-city-planning-meeting-agenda/.


A plat of the KC Foodie Park project at 47th and State Avenue.  To the right of this plat are proposed restaurant sites along State Avenue.

Annual candlelighting ceremony raises funds for KCKCC students

Student leaders sang “Silent Night” during the 94th annual candlelighting ceremony Wednesday at Kansas City Kansas Community College. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Students were urged to “stretch” a little and donate funds to scholarships at Kansas City Kansas Community College’s 94th annual candlelighting ceremony on Wednesday.

The annual candlelighting ceremony is considered to be the longest-standing tradition for the college as well as for Wyandotte County, KCKCC President Greg Mosier told students.

The event started in 1924 as a candle sale to raise funds for the college’s student loan fund, and continues today to raise funds for scholarships for KCKCC students, he said.

Dr. Mosier asked those who were gathered at the candlelighting ceremony to think about those who had helped them in their lives, and to help others in the same way.

More than 100 persons attended the event in the KCKCC Performing Arts Center.

Mary Ricketts, a KCKCC Foundation board member who is a speaker and coach in the financial industry, was the keynote speaker at the event.

“It’s all about leaving a legacy,” Ricketts said. She urged those in attendance to “stretch out and reach the next person,” by giving a donation for student scholarships.

Aliyah Shaw, Student Senate president and a second-year student, said this is one of the highlights of the year for the students. At the ceremony, a candle is passed from one of this year’s student leaders to next year’s student leader.

Shaw said the Student Senate and college plan events to help students, and one of the things she has learned as student president was to meet students where they are. Being the student president has “really made me think about who I am as a student, and it helps me to be a leader,” she said.

Shaw announced a $600 donation from students through the Student Senate to the KCKCC scholarship fund.

Other highlights of the event were performances by the KCKCC Instrumental Ensembles, KCKCC’s The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Intercultural Center students, KCKCC Chamber Choir and students in the KCKCC Theater Department.

Donations to the KCKCC Foundation scholarships for students are being accepted at www.kckcc.edu/foundation.

The KCKCC Instrumental Ensembles, under the direction of Jim Mair, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The KCKCC Instrumental Ensemble performed Wednesday at the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Dr. Greg Mosier, KCKCC president, asked those attending the event to think about persons who had helped them in the past, and to reach out and help others today. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Listening to musical performances at the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

KCKCC theater students performed a short skit for the annual candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

The Standard Vocal Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of John Stafford II, performed for the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Mary Ricketts, KCKCC Foundation board member, asked those attending the candlelighting ceremony to stretch a little and make a donation to the scholarship fund. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Mary Ricketts, KCKCC Foundation board member, asked those attending the candlelighting ceremony to stretch a little and make a donation to the scholarship fund. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Students with the KCKCC Intercultural Center sang a holiday tune at the candlelighting ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Students with the KCKCC Intercultural Center sang a holiday tune at the candlelighting ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Aliyah Shaw, KCKCC Student Senate president, announced a $600 Student Senate donation to the scholarship fund. She posed near the candlelight table at the event. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Aliyah Shaw, right, Student Senate president, announced a $600 donation from the Student Senate to the KCKCC scholarship fund. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Mary Ricketts, right, KCKCC Foundation board member, lit a ceremonial candle on Wednesday at the annual KCKCC candlelighting ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Itzel Almanza, Student Senate vice president, right, lit the candle for Colby Dunbar, representing the freshman class, at the KCKCC candlelighting ceremony Wednesday. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Audience members held battery-powered candles as they sang “Silent Night” and “Joy to the World” with the KCKCC Chamber Choir Wednesday at the KCKCC candlelighting ceremony. (Staff photo by Mary Rupert)

Family of slain Capt. Melton say Lewis’s sentence ‘not just’

Jamaal R. Lewis

In a very emotional sentencing today in Wyandotte County District Court, Jamaal R. Lewis, 22, was sentenced to life in prison for killing police Capt. Robert (David) Melton.

The life sentence carries the potential of parole after 25 years. Lewis also was sentenced to 13 months for aggravated assault and nine months for discharging a firearm, to run consecutively to the 25-year-sentence. Lewis pleaded guilty to killing Capt. Melton, 46.

Melton was looking for suspects in a drive-by shooting near 15th and Rowland at the time he was killed.

Judge Wes Griffin told the family and around 100 persons who crowded into the courtroom, many of them wearing law enforcement uniforms and supporting the Melton family, that he was required to follow the state’s sentencing guidelines. He could not depart from the guidelines. He sentenced Lewis to the maximum sentences under the guidelines, to run consecutively.

Family members who testified today stated they felt that justice was not served by what they considered a light sentence.

John Melton, brother of the slain Kansas City, Kansas, Police Department captain, said he believed Lewis should not be eligible for parole at any time. In an interview after the sentencing, Melton said he didn’t think the sentence was just. Melton said he did some research and discovered that a police dog’s killer got 22 years.

He said probably the best thing that happened today was that the judge set the other sentences to run consecutively to the murder sentence. He added he did not blame the judge. He said he hates the word closure, but he hopes he doesn’t have to see his brother’s face on TV any more.

John Melton, brother of slain Capt. Robert (David) Melton, spoke with the press after the sentencing on Friday. (Staff photo)

Several members of the Melton family and friends addressed the court at the sentencing, their voices breaking at times as they talked about the loss of their relative.

Police Chief Terry Zeigler talked about the effect of the murder on the entire police force. Besides serving with the Kansas City, Kansas, Police Department, Melton had served with the Wyandotte County Sheriff’s Department and with the National Guard in Iraq and Afghanistan, and had received the Bronze Star.

Lynn Melton, sister-in-law of Capt. Melton, told the court that she had researched the issue and this sentence was the lightest one she had seen for someone who had killed a law enforcement officer.

“Our hearts hurt,” one speaker told the court. Some other family members and friends expressed their anger, and some criticized the district attorney’s handling of the case.

Lewis sat nearby in a striped jail jumpsuit, handcuffed, and looked down or away from the speakers. Lewis did not address the court, and did not offer any statements at all.

Dupree explains his position

District Attorney Mark Dupree answered questions about the Jamaal Lewis sentence at a news conference today. (Staff photo)

District Attorney Mark Dupree today called for a change in state laws. Kansas does not have a law requiring mandatory life sentences without parole for the killing of a law enforcement officer, while other states have that law. Dupree said he is asking state legislators to add that law.

Dupree, who held a news conference after the sentencing, had earlier said he could not comment on the case while it was in court. There was a court order in this case, filed on July 26, 2016, preventing him from discussing it while it was in court. There also are ethics rules advising against commenting on cases that have not been completed.

Lewis was originally charged with capital murder for the July 19, 2016, slaying of Capt. Melton, but felony murder was added to the charges, and Lewis pleaded guilty to felony murder.

“We lost a dedicated public servant, a military veteran, a father, a brother, a friend, a colleague, a wonderful human being,” Dupree said at the news conference. “Our community was shattered by the death of Capt. Melton. Today the individual responsible for his death was sentenced to life in prison.”

Dupree said the laws are flawed and do not always allow them to achieve the level of justice that is due, but they work to do their best.

“We set out to remove the individual responsible for the death of Capt. Melton for as long as possible,” Dupree said. “That was achieved through the life sentence handed down today.”

Dupree said competency hearings in this case took almost a year. As a result of those proceedings, it became clear that a death sentence was unlikely, he said. A Supreme Court ruling does not allow the death penalty for those with intellectual disabilities, he added.

Dupree said a key element of the case was premeditation, and a jury might not have agreed that the crime was premeditated. He said the law requires more than the instantaneous taking of another’s life.

“The law enforcement officer who witnessed Capt. Melton’s murder described the shooting as occurring, ‘instantly, almost immediately,’” Dupree said. In this case, there was no chase, no sirens and lights were not on, and there was an unmarked car, he said.

The car approached Lewis from behind as Lewis was walking down the street and quickly turned into the walking path of Lewis, Dupree said. Lewis then fired multiple shots into the vehicle, tragically ending Capt. Melton’s life, he said.

“If the jury did not agree that the shooting was premeditated, the consequence would be a sentence of 12 to 14 years, based on his lack of criminal history, under the Kansas sentencing guidelines. The result would be wholly unacceptable, as there was overwhelming evidence to support the charge of felony murder.”

Dupree said he made the decision, after speaking with experts, law enforcement officers, experienced attorneys employed by his office, a former police officer and a retired FBI agent. Dupree then filed the charge of felony murder in order to ensure a life sentence at trial, he said.

“Given these facts, we had to do what we could do to ensure a life sentence,” Dupree said.

The felony murder consisted of shooting into an occupied vehicle, and death occurred, he said. This equals a life sentence, he said. If the jury could not agree the act was premeditated, he could still achieve a life sentence, he said. The gun belonged to the defendant’s mother, and he was positively identified by the witness as the shooter, he said.

The defendant came into court and said he was guilty as charged, Dupree said. The judge informed the defendant that his guilty plea carried a mandatory life sentence, he said. The court accepted the defendant’s plea of guilty as charged, he added.

“There was no plea agreement, there was no negotiations of a plea, and there is no 25 years,” he said. “There is only a life sentence. It is true that in 25 years, this person who murdered one of our officers will be able to ask one question to a state parole board. That question is, can I be released? I am confident that no person in this community will stand for his release, ever.”

To his knowledge, no person who received a life sentence in Kansas for killing a police officer has ever been released from prison, Dupree said.

“This office and every member of the law enforcement community will be sure never to forget Capt. Melton’s sacrifice and ensure the defendant receives the entire life sentence he received today,” he said.

Dupree said he is advocating for a law that makes the intentional killing of a law enforcement officer a mandatory life sentence without parole.

Without this law, premeditation must be proven without a doubt, he said. There is a far lesser sentence when that cannot be proven, he said.

“The evidence in this case highlights what I believe is a flaw in our current law,” Dupree said. “It is imperative that we do all we can to do justice for law enforcement who pay the ultimate price, as well as their families, for they are the heroes who make the sacrifices to ensure our safety, and for that, we all are grateful.”

Dupree said in the Lewis case, there was never a negotiation for a plea. Some of the facts were not known at that time that comments were made earlier, he said. A clerical error had no effect on the case, he said.

“I need them and they need me, and we have to work together,” Dupree said. “It (our only job) is about making sure our community is protected and our public is safe. The more we get on our soapbox with fighting and disagreeing with each other is the more we are taking away from what our jobs are together, which is protecting our community.”