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The Chevrolet Malibu, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)
The Chevrolet Malibu, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)

by William Crum

This year’s Kansas City Auto Show is a huge success, mainly due to vehicles that are made right here in Kansas City, Kan., at the Fairfax General Motors plant.

The two vehicles made here are midsize sedans, the Chevrolet Malibu and the Buick LaCrosse.

The 2015 Malibu is available with OnStar 4G LTE with Wi-Fi connectivity, start stop technology and a remarkable 36 miles per gallon highway mileage. This particular vehicle is known worldwide as one the best vehicles on the market for reliability. The technology on this particular vehicle and its sister vehicle, the Buick LaCrosse, are both known for their quality, reliability and superior exterior finishes.

Both the Chevy Malibu and its sister, the Buick LaCrosse, are also known for their unique aerodynamic style.

The 2015 Chevy Malibu and the 2015 Buick LaCrosse use a lithium battery that is located in the trunk of both vehicles. The lithium battery is smaller and is a lot more efficient.

In fact, both these vehicles are designed to look good, and the interior is designed to be one of the most comfortable vehicles ever produced.

“Quality is number one,” said Mike Faulkner, who has worked at the plant since 2008 and who lives in the Piper area of Kansas City, Kan. “We are very proud of what we produce at the plant. We want to make sure when a vehicle comes off the line it is the best car you could ever buy for the money and quality as well. We are very proud of what we do and it shows in everything we do.”

For someone who wants a little more style. a good choice would be the Buick LaCrosse. The Buick LaCrosse is comparable to the Lexus and offers a lot more for the money.

The Chevy Malibu and the Buick LaCrosse have received numerous awards from J.D. Power and Associates for style, reliability and overall performance, making this and other vehicles that are produced right here in Kansas City, Kan., some of the best vehicles on the market today.

If you haven’t seen the 2015 Chevy Malibu or the 2015 Buick LaCrosse you can see them now at the KC auto show. When you sit behind the wheel of both the 2015 Chevy Malibu and the 2015 Buick LaCrosse, you will find it not only stylish, but also very comfortable as well.

The Kansas City Auto Show started March 4 and runs through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. For more information on hours and admission cost, visit kcautoshow.com/.

The Chevrolet Malibu, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)
The Chevrolet Malibu, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)

The Buick LaCrosse, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)
The Buick LaCrosse, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)

The Buick LaCrosse, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)
The Buick LaCrosse, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)

The Buick LaCrosse, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)
The Buick LaCrosse, made in Kansas City, Kan., is on display at the Kansas City Auto Show, running through March 8 at Bartle Hall, Kansas City, Mo. (Photo by William Crum)

by Kelly Rogge

Kansas City Kansas Community College’s Wellness and Fitness Center is asking everyone how far they can throw a shamrock in preparation for the center’s second-annual Shamrock Games.

The Shamrock Games are at 11 a.m. Thursday, March 12, at the KCKCC Wellness and Fitness Center. The event is free and open to the public.

“The Shamrock Games are a great way for our students to interact with our staff, faculty and community members in a competitive environment,” said Joseph Mundt, wellness specialist at the KCKCC Wellness and Fitness Center. “The contest is a score prediction competition, which makes it an even playing field for older or younger age groups.”

Games include ShamRockin Bowl, the Pot of Gold Toss, Leprechaun Head Catch, the Gold Coin Fling, ShamRakin, the ShamRock Obstacle Course and the ShamRock Race. Prizes will be awarded to the top finishers. However, all activities must be attempted to get a final score. Donations will also be accepted for the American Cancer Society of Kansas City.

“Many of our participants have said while participating, ‘I haven’t done this stuff since I was a kid,’” Mundt said. “Also during the Shamrock Games, many of the events are geared toward improving hand-eye coordination which tends to lack as we all get older. I think the ShamRock Games gives people a small change from their regular workout routine, which sometimes is the change they need to kick their workout up to the next gear.”

For more information or to register for the KCKCC Shamrock Games, visit the KCKCC Wellness and Fitness Center or call 913-288-7610. Be prepared to go outside for a few of the events.

Kelly Rogge is the public information supervisor at Kansas City Kansas Community College.

A push in the Kansas Legislature would loosen laws allowing people to carry guns in the workplace and to carry concealed weapons without licenses.

Unified Government lobbyist Mike Taylor told the UG Commission Thursday night that it appeared that a concealed carry bill easily passed the Senate and is being heard in the House that allowed people to carry concealed weapons without a permit, a background check or any training.

A second bill, Senate Bill 65, would supersede policy at the UG which does not allow employees to carry a gun while they are on the job, he said. Certain employees, such as the police chief, are exempt from the UG policy. The UG is opposing this bill.

Under this bill, the state Legislature would supersede the UG’s policy and tell it that if an employee has a concealed carry permit, the employer can’t tell the employee not to carry a gun while at work, Taylor said.

Many of the state legislators who are backing this bill rail against the federal government’s imposing health care or environmental mandates on the state, and then the state legislators turn around and do the very same thing to the cities and counties, Taylor said. Many of the state legislators from Wyandotte County are supporting the UG’s position, but they are in the minority.

“I point that out to them [the bill’s backers] frequently how hypocritical that is,” Taylor said. “There is such a thing as local control, and there’s constitutional home rule in Kansas that lets us make those kinds of decisions. But for them to reach into our personnel policies and tell us that we can’t tell our own employees in the workplace how they need to perform, I think is just egregious.”

The UG has received an exemption for three years on allowing guns at its buildings, but after that, it must decide whether to allow guns at the recreation centers or to set up metal detectors and security guards there, he said.

On the topic of carrying a gun without a license, Taylor said, “Whether I’ve got a gun that’s openly showing or got it hidden in my jacket, once I draw that gun, I have a gun in my hand. Shouldn’t I have some kind of training on how to use that gun? I can’t drive a car without taking a test. Shouldn’t I have to take some kind of test to handle a gun?”

Elections
Senate Bill 171 advanced that would move city and school board elections to the fall of odd-numbered years, he said. Currently they are held in the spring. Under the current bill they would remain nonpartisan.

There will be hearings on the bill in the House next week. Taylor said there is a concern that the House might put the state and federal elections together with the city and school elections on one ballot on even-numbered years.

He said he is afraid that if they were at the bottom of the ballot, people would not vote on those contests. Also, some are wondering if the machines that count votes could read long ballots.

Mayor Mark Holland remarked that the bill would double the length of time between the primary and general election for city and county candidates. Now there are five weeks, and this would be 10, a significantly longer campaign season.

Taylor said that so far, the city and school elections are still nonpartisan, which was important to the UG.

Abandoned housing
He said an effort to pass a bill on expediting efforts to deal with abandoned housing has hit a snag in the Legislature. There had been a compromise worked out with different groups, but it ran into late opposition and died at the turnaround day, he said.

As a backup, another bill was introduced on the House side, and Rep. Stan Frownfelter was instrumental in moving the bill forward, Taylor said. There may be hearings on it in the House, he said.

Immigration bill
A bill in the Legislature that would eliminate in-state tuition for immigrants is now carrying several anti-immigration measures, he said. The UG has been working with a coalition on immigration reform.

Taylor said the UG opposes several measures that would cost it more money, including using e-verify on all employees; and requiring police to conduct immigration checks when they make stops. Some of these measures would crowd the local jail, Taylor said, costing local taxpayers more money.

Interest rate on late taxes
A bill that would increase the interest rate charged on those who do not pay their taxes on time was brought back, Taylor said. Its purpose is to be an incentive to pay taxes on time, according to Taylor. The interest would go up by 5 percent to a total of 9 percent.

Tax measures
Taylor said there is a $600 million hole in the budget, just for this year, and the year ends June 30. Between now and June 30, the state is trying to find $600 million, he said.

There are a number of bills introduced that would raise taxes in various areas, he said.

One bill would add sales tax on top of residential utilities, a 5.3 percent additional tax on the customer’s electric bill, he said.

Another one would place a surcharge on transient guest tax, he said. That amount could be a 5.3 percent increase. Taylor said to Overland Park, that would mean a city sales tax, transient tax and surcharge, to total almost 20 percent on top of the hotel bill.

Being close to the state line, he said, some visitors may just decide to stay in Missouri and drive across the state line to visit Kansas without staying in hotels here.

There is also a state proposal that would increase property taxes. Currently, the first 20 mills of the property tax goes to the state to pay for schools, he said. That mill levy is not applied to the first $20,000 of value on a home.

One bill would take that tax exemption away, increasing property taxes as it eliminates the first $20,000 exemption, he said.

There are other bills that would increase taxes on oil leases, royalties and other income, he said.

“It really is like going to the couch and looking under the cushions for nickels and dimes to try to fill a $600 million hole,” Taylor said.

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