Twelve area students named to honor roll, dean’s list at Emporia State University

Twelve students from Bonner Springs, Kansas, and Kansas City, Kansas, were named to the honor roll and dean’s lists for fall 2017 at Emporia State University.

To qualify for the university honor roll, students earned a minimum 3.80 semester grade point average in at least 12 graded hours.

To qualify for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean’s list, students earned a semester grade point average that puts them in the top 10 percent of all students enrolled in full-time undergraduate work within the college and have a cumulative 3.5 GPA for all Emporia State courses.

Students from this area include:

Josh Barnes of Bonner Springs, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.
Katelyn Cochran of Bonner Springs, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.
Haley Lohmann of Bonner Springs, Kansas, university honor roll and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean’s list.
Hannah Baughman of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.
Rachel Castro of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean’s list.
Lacy Davison Symmonds of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.
Cathleen Grissom of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.
Joshua Hall of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.
Raymond Horvat of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll.
Meghan Rice of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.
Megan Sheckells of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean’s list.
Jeneice Waters of Kansas City, Kansas, university honor roll and The Teachers College dean’s list.

Registration open for Blue Devil 5K and Kids Trot May 5

by Kelly Rogge, KCKCC

A Kansas City Kansas Community College tradition returns this spring with the 2018 Blue Devil 5K and Kids Trot.

The Blue Devil 5K, which is in its 14th year, is at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 5. The course winds through the KCKCC campus on the roads, walking paths and sidewalks.

The Kids Trot follows at 9 a.m. and is geared toward children 11-years and younger.

Childcare volunteers will provide activities for the children from 7:30 to 9 a.m., so parents can participate in the run-walk.

Registration for the 5K is $20 per person through March 31. The Kids Trot is $10. Registration for both the Blue Devil 5K and the Kid’s Trot includes a T-shirt, Finisher’s Medal, Goodie Bag and an all-you-can eat pancake breakfast following the event. About 200 people participated in the 5K and Kids Trot in 2017.

Awards will be given to the top overall male and female finishers. In addition, the winner of each age group will receive an award and a prize. Children in the Kids Trot will run in heats based on age groups. Distances will range from 25 meters to one-quarter of a mile. No strollers are allowed.

“People should participate in the Blue Devil 5k and Kids Trot for the pancakes at the end of the race,” said Joe Mundt, wellness specialist at KCKCC. “In reality, people should participate because this is a really fun event for the whole family, plus you get a finisher’s medal and prizes in addition to the pancakes at the end. We also provide activities with professional staff for kids while their parents complete the 5k. Blue Devil 5k is a great way to take your exercise plan to the next level.”

For more information about the Blue Devil 5K Run/Walk and Kids Trot, visit www.kckcc.edu/campus-life/health-rec/WFC/blue-devil-fun-run-walk. Information is also available by calling the KCKCC Wellness and Fitness Center at 913-288-7610. An entry form must be filled out for each registrant.

Early bird registration can be completed at https://www.imathlete.com/#/legacy?url=%2Fevents%2FEventReg%2FEventReg_SelectType.aspx%3FfEID%3D67722%26fNew%3D1%26fsource%3DimASearch.

Registration can also be completed in person at the KCKCC Wellness Center. Volunteers are also needed. For information on how to volunteer for the Blue Devil 5K Run-Walk and Kids Trot, call 913-288-7370.

Kansas school funding report in hand, lawmakers confront its tough, pricey suggestions

by Stephen Koranda, Kansas News Service

Now that Republican leaders have a report they commissioned on school funding, it’s not clear they’ll pursue its recommendations to spend more for better student performance.

Lawmakers continued digging into the numbers Monday and quizzed the study’s authors for the first time since the document was unveiled Friday.

The study suggests lawmakers boost school spending by up to 44 percent over five years. That would mean pouring an additional $2 billion into education. Legislators are searching for ways to respond to a state Supreme Court ruling that says schools aren’t adequately funded.

Some previous estimates of the cost to comply with the court ruling were around $600 million. Those were dwarfed by the latest report.

The study’s main author, Texas A&M University researcher Lori Taylor, said the consultants found a “strong, statistically significant” relationship between spending and student performance.

Taylor said the big funding boost recommended in the study would kick-start student outcomes.

“First, you have to catch up,” Taylor said. “There would need to be some additional funding to bring the students, basically, up to grade level.”

In addition, Taylor told lawmakers that schools were already running quite efficiently. She said their study found inefficiencies in Kansas schools were only around one-third of what they found in some other states.

“That is remarkably good,” Taylor said. “It suggests a very prudent use of the resources.”

Some Republicans are warning of the consequences that would come from a major funding boost for schools.

Republican Senate President Susan Wagle issued a statement Monday saying tax increases or spending cuts would follow if lawmakers send large increases in spending to local school districts.

“Kansans cannot afford what the court is demanding,” she said. “We cannot afford what the new study is recommending.”

There would be no appetite for a tax increase in an election year, said Republican Sen. Gene Suellentrop. He said lawmakers would have to make massive cuts to other state services if they boost spending in the way the study recommends.

“If we pour this kind of money into education without regard to anything else, what will our state look like in 10 years?” Suellentrop asked. “What will the infrastructure look like? What will our health care look like? What will our corrections facilities look like?”

Republican Sen. Molly Baumgardner said the study’s funding increases were aimed at a 95-percent high school graduation rate, which no state has achieved. She said lawmakers probably would not pursue that.

“You talk about a shot to the moon, it is a shot to the moon for every state,” Baumgardner said. “We can come up with some very realistic and appropriate goals for our state.”

Republican Rep. Melissa Rooker is one of the lawmakers who has advocated for more school funding in recent years. She said the study changes the conversation. To her, the question now is whether lawmakers are willing to pay for schools that produce better outcomes.

“What is it we expect from our schools and are we willing to fund that expectation?” Rooker asked. “This identifies the costs of achievement.”

Lawmakers could build a plan that would start to approach the funding targets without busting the state budget, said Democratic Rep. Ed Trimmer. He said some money would be needed up front, but much of the funding could be phased in with a long-term plan.

“Realistically, schools could not absorb that much money over a few years,” Trimmer said.

Trimmer said tying future funding increases to the inflation rate could help forge an agreement.

“I think it’s possible,” he said, “but we don’t have much time.”

The Kansas Supreme Court has ordered lawmakers to approve a new school funding plan by the end of April so the justices can rule before the end of June.

Stephen Koranda is Statehouse reporter for Kansas Public Radio, a partner in the Kansas News Service. Follow him on Twitter @kprkoranda. Kansas News Service stories and photos may be republished at no cost with proper attribution and a link back to the original post.

See more at http://kcur.org/post/kansas-school-funding-report-hand-lawmakers-confront-its-tough-pricey-suggestions