KCKCC rebounds from opening loss in national volleyball tourney

by Alan Hoskins

Kansas City Kansas Community College stayed alive in the NJCAA Division II national tournament today with a decisive 3-0 win over Genesee, N.Y.

The win sends the 7th seeded Lady Blue Devils (30-10) into the semifinals of the loser’s bracket against either No. 11 Sauk Valley (36-7) or No. 14 Northern Virginia (23-9) today at 5:30 p.m. (Kansas City time). The Blue Devils made quick work of 15th seeded Genesee, winning 25-12, 25-9, 25-11.

A win in the semifinals would send the Blue Devils into the 9th place championship game Saturday at 11 a.m. All games can be seen on-line on the NJCAA website and clicking on Division II and NJCAA TV.

No. 10 Glendale, Ariz., dealt KCKCC a 3-0 setback in Thursday’s opening round, jumping to a 25-12 first set win. Glendale had 19 kills in a 25-23 second set win before coming from behind in the third set. KCKCC led 21-19 only to have Glendale score the next five points on the way to a 25-22 win.

Glendale followed its win over KCKCC with a 3-2 upset of No. 2 seeded Central Nebraska while No. 6 Cowley knocked off No. 3 Illinois Central 3-1. Those two teams will collide in the championship semifinals tonight with No. 1 Parkland and No. 5 Columbus State clashing in other semifinal.
Alan Hoskins is the public information supervisor for KCKCC.

KVC helps Kansas children find forever families during national adoption month

After several children found their forever families today, a balloon launch was held in downtown Kansas City, Kan. (Photo from Jenny Kutz )
After several children found their forever families today, a balloon launch was held in downtown Kansas City, Kan. (Photo from Jenny Kutz )

by William Crum

The KVC did a major kickoff at the Wyandotte County Courthouse on North 7th Street in Kansas City, Kan., where recently adopted children with their parents released balloons in honor of National Adoption Month.

Since 2005 they have had 2,376 adoptions and 390 still waiting to be adopted in Kansas.

In Kansas last year there were 35,551 reports of child abuse and neglect. There are 6,167 children in foster care and 390 children are waiting to be adopted. The greatest adoption needs are for children 9 years and older, members of a sibling group, and children with significant physical, medial or emotional needs.

“National Adoption Day is one of the most joyful days of the year,” said Chad Anderson, president of KVC Kansas. “For the adopted parents, for KVC staff and especially for the children, is the culmination of a lot of hoping, waiting and hard work. We are thankful for the families that step up to the plate to become a permanent, loving family for children who have experienced abuse and neglect and thankful to the judges throughout Kansas who bring attention to the need for more adoptive families.”

KVC Kansas is a private, nonprofit child welfare and behavioral health care organization. The organization offers one the nation’s broadest continuums of care, and has provided foster care case management longer than any other private organization in the United States. KVC is responsible for the care of all children served by the Kansas Department for Children and Families in two regions, representing 30 countries and more of all children in the child welfare system (3000 plus). In its 44-year history, KVC has grown from a single home for boys in Kansas City, Kan., to a national organization touching the lives of more than 50,000 people each year.

After several children found their forever families today, a balloon launch was held in downtown Kansas City, Kan. (Photo from Jenny Kutz )
After several children found their forever families today, a balloon launch was held in downtown Kansas City, Kan. (Photo from Jenny Kutz )

KCKCC takes time to read to kids

Volunteers read to children who attend KCKCC’s Campus Child Care Center during the center’s annual Thanksgiving Lunch. (KCKCC photo)
Volunteers read to children who attend KCKCC’s Campus Child Care Center during the center’s annual Thanksgiving Lunch. (KCKCC photo)

by Kelly Rogge

Staff and faculty at Kansas City Kansas Community College have been spending the last few days sharing their love of reading with the children at the KCKCC Campus Childcare Center.

Nov. 17 to 21 is Kansas Reads to Preschoolers Week, a week that focuses on reading to all children from birth to 12 years old who are enrolled in Center Learning Programs and for Family Day Care Homes.

“The Kansas Reads to Preschoolers Week offers young children in the state of Kansas a chance to be read to by teachers, parents, neighbors, professors, college students and local libraries within the child’s local community,” said Doris Holleman, director of the KCKCC Campus Child Care Center. “The benefits of reading to children will offer babies, young children and youth the opportunity to look at books together with the reader, pointing to pictures in books and talk about what they see.”

More than 120 KCKCC faculty, staff and students signed up to read to children at the Campus Child Care Center this week. Holleman said reading benefits young children, youth and even babies by giving them the chance to learn new words and learn to enjoy books. She said infants and young children also have the opportunity to move and play along with the reader and other children.

“Basically, children can play make-believe, and explore new objects, places and people. Reading to older children allows them to talk about their day and ask questions that begin with who, what and why,” Holleman said. “Older children can use complete sentences to describe what is happening in the story, and they can make predictions and perform high critical thinking skills to retell stories in their own words.”

Holleman said she thinks the volunteers enjoy getting to share their love of literacy and literature for all age groups of infants, young children and youth. She said these individuals can think back to some of their favorite books such as Dr. Seuss or book collections and other favorite authors they had during their childhood.

“For some, Kansas Reads to Preschooler Week gives them the opportunity to step out of their formal role and enjoy being with people who will not judge them for using a funny voice or sitting on the floor. For others, it affords them a chance to be children again and/or relive their childhood or their children’s childhoods through connecting with a child or group of children,” she said. “Many say that they enjoy seeing the looks on the faces of the children as they begin to understand the story and be able to read along with it. Lastly, it opens doors for relationships with other departments and/or agencies that may have never been explored or developed otherwise.”

For more information on Kansas Read to Preschoolers Week, contact Doris Holleman at 913-288-7615 or by email at dholleman@kckcc.edu.

Kelly Rogge is the public information supervisor at Kansas City Kansas Community College.

Volunteers read to children who attend KCKCC’s Campus Child Care Center during the center’s annual Thanksgiving Lunch. (KCKCC photo)
Volunteers read to children who attend KCKCC’s Campus Child Care Center during the center’s annual Thanksgiving Lunch. (KCKCC photo)