Yoder visits Fairfax area in KCK

State Rep. Pam Curtis, left, visited with U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder today at a meeting of the Fairfax Industrial Association at the General Motors plant in Kansas City, Kan. (Photo by William Crum)
State Rep. Pam Curtis, left, visited with U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder today at a meeting of the Fairfax Industrial Association at the General Motors plant in Kansas City, Kan. (Photo by William Crum)

by William Crum
U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder, R-3rd Dist., was the keynote speaker at the Fairfax industrial Association at the group’s monthly luncheon today.

More than 100 people attended this event, which was held at the General Motors plant in Kansas City, Kan.

“The best thing now is Congress is in recess. Congress needs to work together to get things done. However, we did get a lot done. We did get a lot of bills passed,” Rep. Yoder said.

When asked if he planned to hold a job fair in Wyandotte County, as currently he is holding job fairs in Johnson County, Rep. Yoder said, “I would love to get a job fair in Wyandotte County; however things have not worked out that way. However, we have tried to work out something with Work Force Partnership in the past. This is mainly due to a scheduling conflict.”

When asked what he thinks of a new ruling from the Environmental Protection Agency regarding new compliance regulations, Rep. Yoder said, “We need to delay this ruling. It is not fair for the power companies to meet these compliance regulations right away. We definitely need to delay this ruling, after all it would put too much of a burden on the general consumer. It would cause too much of an increase on the general consumer’s utility bill, particularly for those who are on a fixed income. This is something I’m totally against.”

Toward the end of the meeting a member of the audience asked what is going to happen to the student loan situation.

U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder, R-3rd Dist., addressed the meeting of the Fairfax Industrial Association today in Kansas City, Kan. (Photo by William Crum)
U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder, R-3rd Dist., addressed the meeting of the Fairfax Industrial Association today in Kansas City, Kan. (Photo by William Crum)

It is very hard for a person fresh out of college to find a job. The graduates are burdened by the student loans later on in life.

“We need to get back to the basics,” Rep Yoder said. “We need to encourage colleges and universities to help the recent graduates find jobs in their chosen fields and while in college make the loans more affordable so everyone can get a higher education if they choose to do so.”

At the end of the meeting Congressman Yoder walked around and shook everyone’s hand and thanked them for attending the meeting.

The Fairfax Industrial Association met today in the auditorium of the General Motors plant in Kansas City, Kan. (Photo by William Crum)
The Fairfax Industrial Association met today in the auditorium of the General Motors plant in Kansas City, Kan. (Photo by William Crum)

UG joins with Nextdoor, private social network for neighborhoods

The Unified Government of Wyandotte County-Kansas City, Kan., announced today a partnership with Nextdoor, the private social network for neighborhoods, to improve countywide and neighbor-to-neighbor communications.

This integration with Nextdoor will enable the UG’s public relations team, mayor’s office, Liveable Neighborhoods along with other departments, to build stronger, safer communities with the help of residents.

“Today, we are excited to officially partner with Nextdoor,” said Mayor Mark Holland. “Nextdoor will provide residents with more avenues to easily and effectively connect with city departments, and each other, about the things that matter most to their communities.”

Already Nextdoor has proven to be an essential and well-adopted tool for Kansas City area residents, according to the UG. To date, more than 25 neighborhoods in Kansas City, Kan., are using Nextdoor.

With Nextdoor, residents can join private neighborhood websites to share information, including neighborhood public safety issues, community events and activities, local services, and even lost pets. UG departments will be able to post information, such as important news, services, programs, public events, and emergency and safety notifications to Nextdoor websites within the city.

Nextdoor is free for residents and the UG. Each Kansas City neighborhood has its own private Nextdoor neighborhood website, accessible only to residents who verify that they live in the neighborhood. Neighborhoods establish and self-manage their own Nextdoor websites and UG departments will not be able to access residents’ websites, contact information, or content. Information shared on Nextdoor is password protected and cannot be accessed by Google or other search engines. Alternatively, residents can use a reverse address lookup to find out more about their neighbors, simply by knowing their name, phone number or email address.

Those interested in joining their neighborhood’s Nextdoor website can visit www.nextdoor.com and enter their address. If residents have questions about their Nextdoor website, visit help.nextdoor.com.

– Information from Unified Government

Agencies receive mental health grants

Several area nonprofit agencies have received mental health grants from the Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City.

In all, $4.25 million was awarded in Greater Kansas City.

“HCF is committed to improving access to mental health services through strengthening systems and delivery practices. We are proud to award these agencies funds to support their efforts in providing behavioral health programs,” said Dr. Bridget McCandless, president-CEO of HCF.

Among the grant recipients:

– Associated Youth Services, $91,509, for outpatient mental health and psychiatric services for Wyandotte County youth and their families through a collaboration with the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Program at the University of Kansas School of Medicine.

– Kansas University Endowment Association, $98,975, to establish the first Primary Care Postdoctoral Fellowship for psychologists in the Kansas City area, initiate integrated behavioral health training for family medicine residents, and to place psychology interns alongside medical, nursing, and pharmacy students in the Inter-Professional Training Clinic, thereby establishing a seamless progression of integrated care training.

– PACES, $100,000, to hire two licensed mental health therapists in year one and a third therapist in year two to develop an expedited referral process to outreach parents, and to provide needed therapy or referrals to other services to benefit K-6th graders in elementary schools identified with greatest needs in the Kansas City, Kan., Public Schools; to serve as a resource to teachers and staff in these schools.