Weather

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National Weather Service graphic
National Weather Service graphic

The National Weather Service said that the storm system moving into the region has slowed down and is not expected to move into the local area until late this evening and overnight.

This has shifted the highest threat for strong to severe storms westward, according to the weather service.

Wyandotte County is in a marginal risk area.

Weakening thunderstorms moving in from the west will spread into these areas between 6 p.m. and midnight, the weather service said. The main threats will be large hail 1 inch or greater and locally damaging winds to 60 mph. They may be scattered only.

Locally heavy rainfall and minor flooding is also possible especially north of I-70, according to the weather service.

Storms will continue to weaken when they reach these marginal risk areas between 8 p.m. and 5 a.m. There could be isolated instances of hail near 1 inch or winds of 55 to 60 mph, but the overall severe threat is low, the weather service said.

For more weather updates, visit www.weather.gov.

National Weather Service graphic
National Weather Service graphic

Severe storm risk (National Weather Service graphic)
Severe storm risk (National Weather Service graphic)

Isolated strong to severe thunderstorms are possible on Friday, according to the National Weather Service.

Rain was falling about 8 a.m. in parts of Wyandotte County. There is a chance of showers and possibly a thunderstorm between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., the weather service said.

The chance of showers and thunderstorms continues after 11 a.m., the weather service said. The chance of precipitation is 60 percent, and a south-southeast wind from 10 to 15 mph is expected, with gusts as high as 22 mph. There could be a tenth to a quarter of an inch of rain possible.

Tonight, there is a 90 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 1 a.m., the weather service said. A south southeast wind of 13 to 15 mph may gust as high as 21 mph. There could be between a half to three-quarters of an inch of rain.

Wyandotte County is in the “marginal” risk category for severe storms, according to a weather service graphic, which means isolated severe thunderstorms are possible.

The weather service anticipates the strongest storms will be west of a line from Falls City, Neb., to Sedalia, Mo., which includes Wyandotte County. Some isolated flooding may be possible along and north of Highway 36, around the St. Joseph, Mo., area, because of heavy rain, according to the weather service.

On Saturday, expect showers and thunderstorms before 1 p.m. The chance of rain is 30 percent, and it will be windy, with a south southwest wind of 13 to 18 mph becoming northwest in the afternoon, and winds gusting as high as 28 mph.

To keep up to date on the weather today, visit www.weather.gov.

Rainfall forecasts (National Weather Service graphic)
Rainfall forecasts (National Weather Service graphic)

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National Weather Service graphic
National Weather Service graphic

It was a cool 47 degrees at 8 a.m. Thursday, with a high near 63 predicted today.

During the next few days, expect some storms and rain. While Thursday will be clear, Friday could have showers starting at 2 a.m. Rain and storms then are possible each day through Saturday.

The National Weather Service said the risk for strong to severe thunderstorms is in the forecast for Friday afternoon through the evening.

Large hail will be the primary threat. There is a small threat for isolated tornadoes mainly within the “enhanced” outlook area, according to the weather service. Wyandotte County is north of that area.

Rainfall in excess of 1 inch with local amounts up to 2 inches in stronger storms is possible, the weather service said.

A warm layer of air aloft known as a “cap” may be difficult to break through and delay the onset or greatly limit the amount of severe weather, according to the weather service.

The first wave of showers and thunderstorms is expected to arrive after midnight tonight, the weather service said. The rain will spread from west to east and exit in the afternoon. The rainfall tied to this first wave will average around a quarter of an inch, according to the weather service.

A second and potentially much stronger round of thunderstorms is expected to form over central Kansas and track northeast along a warm front Friday evening, according to the weather service.

In addition to the threat of severe thunderstorms locally heavy rainfall and minor flooding will define this period, the weather service said. An additional half-inch to 1 inch of rain is likely with local amounts up to 2 inches possible.

For more weather information, visit www.weather.gov.

National Weather Service graphic
National Weather Service graphic

National Weather Service graphic
National Weather Service graphic

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