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A Kansas woman pleaded guilty Monday to failing to report that a 17-year-old girl was working as a prostitute, U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom said.

Brittany L. Morris, 25, Winfield, Kan., pleaded guilty to one count of misprision of a felony.

In her plea, she admitted that on April 11, 2013, she received a call from two officers working undercover who called in response to an advertisement on the Internet.

Morris arranged for herself and a 17-year-old girl to meet the officers at a hotel off K-10 Highway near DeSoto, Kan., to exchange sex acts for money.

At the hotel, Morris told the officers the price would be $600 an hour. When Morris was arrested, officers learned that the girl with her was 17 years old.

The girl admitted to working as a prostitute in New Orleans, Wichita and Kansas City with Morris, according to the U.S. attorney’s office. Both Morris and the girl posted advertisements on the Internet offering sexual services, the U.S. attorney’s office stated.

Sentencing is set for Feb. 18. Both parties agreed to recommend a sentence of between eight and 14 months in federal prison. Grissom commended the FBI and Assistant U.S. Attorney Kim Martin for their work on the case.

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The Kansas City, Kan., Branch NAACP will meet from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 2, at the KCKPS Training Center, first floor, 2010 N. 59th St. (59th and Parallel Parkway), Kansas City, Kan.

It will be the annual Holiday Reception. A short meeting will be held. Year-end reports of committees are mandatory for the period of January through December 2014.

For further information, call 913-281-7900 or fax 913-281-7847.

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Bryan Kidney, president of FreeWheels For Kids. (Photo by William Crum)
Bryan Kidney, president of FreeWheels For Kids. (Photo by William Crum)

by William Crum

FreeWheels for Kids is an organization that empowers youth to improve their lives and the health of the community.

They teach students the basics of bicycle mechanics and how to ride safely. Plus they help provide youth bicycles, helmets and other tools to help them be safe and successful bikers.

They start in elementary school with basic writing skills and traffic safety. In middle school students go through a comprehensive bike repair class and earn a bike of their own. They teach them traffic safety and writing skills and take them on group rides throughout Kansas City. For many students, this is the first time getting to know the resources that are available in their neighborhoods. They also help students start clubs.

Each group of students chooses a project to improve the health and accessibility of Kansas City. These projects include political advocacy, trail building, upgrades to local parks and community education.

At the open house students gave a presentation on what their club is doing to improve the community. They also talked about future plans.

“Next year we are planning a $350,000 budget,” said Bryan Kidney, president of FreeWheels for Kids.

At the open house there were parents, as well as a student who came to learn more about FreeWheels for Kids.

FreeWheels for Kids bike event on Saturday. (Photo by William Crum)
FreeWheels for Kids bike event on Saturday. (Photo by William Crum)

Tony and Irene Burns of the Boys and Girls Club of Wyandotte County. (Photo by William Crum)
Tony and Irene Burns of the Boys and Girls Club of Wyandotte County. (Photo by William Crum)

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