Blanket of snow covers Wyandotte County

Snow fell overnight in Wyandotte County.
Snow fell overnight in Wyandotte County. (Staff photo)

About 2 to 4 inches of snow fell overnight in Wyandotte County.

As a winter weather advisory ends this morning, there is still the chance of more snow and freezing drizzle before 3 p.m., according to the National Weather Service. Motorists are advised to be careful.

Then there is a chance of drizzle between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. today.

The temperature was 30 degrees at 9 a.m. Thursday, and the high will be near 33 today.

Tonight, there will be cloudy skies with a low around 27.

Friday’s forecast is cloudy with a high near 37. East southeast winds around 6 mph will become calm in the afternoon. On Friday night, it will be mostly cloudy with a low near 30.

Saturday’s forecast is partly sunny with a high near 39. Saturday night, the low will be around 33.

Sunday’s high will be near 45, and Sunday night, there is a 30 percent chance of rain, with a low around 38.

Motorists made their way to work this morning at I-70 near I-635 in Wyandotte County. (KC Scout photo)
Motorists made their way to work this morning at I-70 near I-635 in Wyandotte County. (KC Scout photo)

I-70 east at 7th Street in Kansas City, Kan., is seen in this KC Scout photo.
I-70 east at 7th Street in Kansas City, Kan., is seen in this KC Scout photo.

A backyard scene in Wyandotte County. (Staff photo)
A backyard scene in Wyandotte County. (Staff photo)

Estimated snow totals for Wednesday night and Thursday. (National Weather Service graphic)
Estimated snow totals for Wednesday night and Thursday. (National Weather Service graphic)

K-7 to eastbound I-70 ramp opens

The new K-7 to eastbound I-70 interchange ramp opened to traffic at 12:10 p.m. Wednesday. (KDOT photo)
The new K-7 to eastbound I-70 interchange ramp opened to traffic at 12:10 p.m. Wednesday. (KDOT photo)

At 12:10 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 17, the new K-7 to eastbound I-70 ramp was opened to unrestricted traffic in Bonner Springs.

The ramp work was part of the K-7 and I-70 interchange project Phase 1 construction.

A KDOT spokeswoman said that if K-7 traffic tries to use the old eastbound I-70 ramp, they will end up on westbound I-70 on the Kansas Turnpike, and traffic will then not be able to turn around until they reach the KTA toll plaza seven miles west of the K-7 and I-70 interchange.

The new K-7 to eastbound I-70 ramp is accessed at Speaker Road, just south of I-70. Access to the existing K-7 to eastbound I-70 ramp was located at Canaan Drive and this eastbound I-70 ramp access only (at Canaan Drive) was closed to all traffic at 2:45 p.m. today.

The existing ramp bridge over I-70 will be removed via equipment starting tomorrow, Thursday, Dec. 18, weather permitting. It will take several days to remove the bridge and traffic impacts will include lane closures and short slowdowns during off peak hours on I-70.

Updated daily traffic information for this project and for the entire Kansas City metro area can be viewed online any time at: www.ksdot.org/kcmetro/laneclose.asp.

Construction information for the K-7 and I-70 interchange project, phases 1 and 2A-2B, including phasing schedule and traffic impacts, is online at http://www.ksdot.org/Assets/wwwksdotorg/bureaus/kcMetro/pdf/K-7%20and%20I-70%20Phase%202B%20Project%20Handout.pdf.

Feds indict woman who marketed ‘secret sauce’ to cancer victims

A Tulsa woman who used the Internet to market what she called her “secret sauce” to cancer victims in Kansas and elsewhere was indicted Wednesday on 13 counts of wire fraud, U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom said.

A federal grand jury returned a 13-count indictment against Maureen Long, 64, Tulsa, Okla. The indictment alleges Long’s Internet-based business, Camelot Cancer Care, Inc., preyed on people who were desperately seeking cures for cancer by selling them infusions of drugs that were misbranded and not approved for treating cancer.

Long, who was not a physician, a nurse or any other kind of licensed medical professional, used her Web site and email to create the false impression she was running a legitimate medical clinic. She sold clients drugs that the Food and Drug Administration – she called it the “Federal Death Administration” — had not approved for treating cancer.

Eleven Kansas residents paid more than $128,000 total for Long’s treatments. Residents of Kansas towns including Lenexa, Spring Hill, Hartford, Prairie Village, Hesston, Ottawa and Mt. Hope were among the victims. They had been diagnosed with illnesses including ovarian cancer, esophageal cancer, rectal and lymph cancer, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, cervical cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, brain tumor and breast cancer.

The indictment also alleges Long:

• Falsely claimed that Camelot had a 60 percent success rate resulting in either remission of cancer or stopping a tumor’s growth.
• Marketed something she called the “DMSO Protocol,” which was supposed to consist of DMSO, Vitamin C and Vitamin B-17 (also known as Amygdalin or Laetrile). A forensic chemical analysis of some of the products, however, found neither DMSO nor Laetrile.
• Distributed marketing materials claiming the infusion she sold would cut through malignancy “like a scythe through a wheat field.”
• Charged $12,000 or more for a first round of treatment and $3,600 for each subsequent round.
• Instructed clients to forego traditional treatments of radiation and chemotherapy.

If convicted, Long faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000 on each count. The Food and Drug Administration investigated. Assistant U.S. Attorney Tanya Treadway is prosecuting.