Residents get a hint of what police officers go through in citizen police academy

A citizen police academy class started earlier this week to let residents see for themselves the training that police officers receive. (Photo by William Crum)
A citizen police academy class started earlier this week to let residents see for themselves the training that police officers receive. (Photo by William Crum)

by William Crum
The Kansas City, Kan., Police Department started a program called Citizen Police Academy on Monday, Sept. 8.

To be enrolled in the program you must be a resident, a student, or employed in Kansas City, Kan. Applicants must be 21 years of age. The class size is limited to 20 people.

The participants go to two evenings per week for seven weeks from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., which equals 40 hours total. Participants are encouraged to be on time and only one excused absence is accepted. This is similar to what a person who goes to the police academy has to go through.

“The purpose of this program is to give local citizens of all walks of life a chance to find out for themselves, what a police officer goes through while in training,” said said Kansas City, Kan., Officer William Barajas Jr., a senior master patrolman with the Police Academy who is citizen-intern liaison.

Because of programs like this, there has been a considerable decrease in crime through citizen involvement, he said.

Within this program they will talk about the mission statement of the Police Department and the ethics and the values of the department itself. It gives the citizens who participate in the program a better understanding of the operation and procedures of the Police Department, and a better understanding of the role of the police officer. It promotes more positive citizen interactions with the police and shows how citizens can help the police. Police officers have to make judgment calls many times on very short notice.

Within the class the participants will receive greater knowledge regarding the laws concerning arrest, search and seizure, testifying in court, the prosecution process, as well as proper police procedures, what it takes to do a proper police patrol, and the use of the firearms training system in judgment situations.

At the end of the course the participants will be issued a certificate. This course is only offered in the fall of every year. During the last several years this course has gained popularity among local residents.

As of now, the Kansas City, Kan., Police Department is planning to hold this class next fall. If you ever wanted to know what a police officer has to go through, you may get more information on taking the class next fall by contacting the Kansas City, Kan., Police Training Academy at 913-596-2056.

Residents get a chance to see what police training is like in the citizen police academy, according to Kansas City, Kan., Officer  William Barajas Jr., a senior master patrolman with the Police Academy who is citizen-intern liaison. (Photo by William Crum)
Residents get a chance to see what police training is like in the citizen police academy, according to Kansas City, Kan., Officer William Barajas Jr., a senior master patrolman with the Police Academy who is citizen-intern liaison. (Photo by William Crum)

Assistant Kansas City, Kan., Police Chief Kevin Steele talked to those attending the citizen policy academy. (Photo by William Crum)
Assistant Kansas City, Kan., Police Chief Kevin Steele talked to those attending the citizen policy academy. (Photo by William Crum)

Recipient, donor family favor keeping organ donations close to home

from KU Hospital

Gene Dorsey says two people saved his life the night he received his liver transplant — his donor Karen Martin and her husband, Victor.

“In many states, no matter what you put on your driver’s license, your next of kin has the final say,” Dorsey said. “That’s why it’s important to talk your family about your decision to be an organ donor.”

Both Gene Dorsey and Victor Martin are concerned about plans in discussion by United Network for Organ Sharing to distribute livers nationally instead of regionally. Bigger coastal cities where organ donation lags behind want to take from organs donated in the Midwest, South and Southeast, where donation rates are among the best in the nation.

Martin and Dorsey believe it is better for the patient and the liver to keep donated organs closer to home. Martin says an added benefit is knowing how his wife’s precious of gift of life was received.

“Getting to know Gene has been a blessing for me and my family,” Martin said. “I can’t imagine how we would have connected with another transplant patient and family if Karen’s organ had been flown to either coast.”

Members of the Region 8 transplant community will travel to Chicago Sept. 16, to participate in a public hearing before a UNOS committee on plans to reallocate donor livers from the highest donation regions to the sickest patients in the lowest donations regions. Dorsey and Martin want the committee to postpone plans to reallocate organs, study the issue more and work to increase organ donation among bigger coastal cities.

To see a KU Hospital video about this topic, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nupG8w79q4

– Story and video from KU Hospital

Piper results

Piper High School – 9th volleyball vs. Blue Valley Southwest/Baldwin
– vs. Blue Valley Southwest 2-0 (11 and 13)
– vs. Baldwin 2-0 (19 and 13)

Piper High School – soccer vs. Maranatha
– Piper varsity wins 4-0
– Wilson (2), C. Ford, and L. Smith; shutout by S. Ford

Piper High School – football at Lansing
– Piper junior varsity wins 29-20
– TD’s by VanHoose (3) and A. Letcher
9th wins 8-0
– TD by Ash and 2-point conversion by Wallace

– From Doug Key, Piper activities director