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Two-year-old Eduardo Lopez Martinez is in critical condition at the University of Kansas Hospital following a hit-and-run accident Nov. 24.  Police are asking for the public's help in finding out information about the accident. (Photo from KU Hospital)
Two-year-old Eduardo Lopez Martinez is in critical condition at the University of Kansas Hospital following a hit-and-run accident Nov. 24. Police are asking for the public’s help in finding out information about the accident. (Photo from KU Hospital)

Two-year-old Eduardo Lopez Martinez of Kansas City, Kan., is in critical condition at the University of Kansas Hospital after a hit-and-run accident Nov. 24.

The driver of an older white four-door Chrysler drove away from the scene of the accident, at 1127 N. 32nd St., police stated.

Since the accident, the victim’s condition has improved, and he remains at KU Hospital, the police spokesman said.

Police asked anyone with information to assist them. The accident remains under investigation by the Kansas City, Kan., Police Department’s Traffic Support Unit-Critical Collision Response Team, which is encouraging anyone with information to call the TIPS hotline at 816-474-TIPS.

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The right lane of eastbound I-70 from 134th to K-7 will be closed for ramp construction work at 9 a.m. Monday, Dec. 1, and will reopen to all traffic at 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 6.

According to the Kansas Department of Transportation, the lane will be closed 24-7, around the clock. The reopening date will be weather-permitting.

This work is part of Phase 1 construction for the 10-phase K-7 and I-70 interchange project in Wyandotte County, a KDOT spokesman said.

Updated daily traffic information for this interchange project and for the entire Kansas Metro Area can be viewed online at: www.ksdot.org/kcmetro/laneclose.asp.

The overall Phase 1 project work is scheduled to be completed by late fall 2014, weather permitting.

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Observing the 25th anniversary of the Duchesne Clinic recently were, left to right, Judy Scott, chairwoman of Caritas Clinics (Duchesne and Saint Vincent Clinics) Board of Directors, Amy Falk, executive director, Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann, of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas  and Jim and Georgia Lynch, Regional Hospitallers, Order of Malta. (Photo from Duchesne Clinic)
Observing the 25th anniversary of the Duchesne Clinic recently were, left to right, Judy Scott, chairwoman of Caritas Clinics (Duchesne and Saint Vincent Clinics) Board of Directors, Amy Falk, executive director, Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann, of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas and Jim and Georgia Lynch, Regional Hospitallers, Order of Malta. (Photo from Duchesne Clinic)

by Catherine Rice
For 25 years, Duchesne Clinic, located in Kansas City, Kan., has provided quality and compassionate healthcare to those who are uninsured and experiencing chronic illness, pain or sickness.

The doors to the clinic opened formally in 1988, but the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth began their outreach initially through a mobile clinic serving Wyandotte County’s homeless and shelter residents.

Today, the safety-net clinic, supported through donations and grants, provides health care to more than 2,000 patients a year—and the need continues to grow.

To celebrate this milestone, the clinic held a Founders Mass and Celebration at St. Mary-St. Anthony Church on Nov. 18, the Feast Day of St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, for whom the clinic is named.

Archbishop Joseph F. Nauman, along with Sisters of Charity, board members, staff, Order of Malta, Ladies of Charity and others attended the celebration.

“The tradition that began 25 years ago is still going strong,” said Judy Scott, board chairwoman of Caritas Clinics (Duchesne and Saint Vincent’s Clinics). “It was heartwarming to see so many good friends of the clinic attend our celebration. We’ve been able to meet the needs because of the tremendous support and dedication of so many through their financial gifts and time to bring health and hope to the patients of Duchesne.”

In addition, the clinic recognized those who, through their public service, also serve as champions of the clinic. They included Chief Ellen Hansen and the men and women of the Kansas City, Kan., Police Department and Kansas Sen. Steve Fitzgerald.

“The Sisters’ vision, that healthcare is a basic human right, still informs and drives the work of Duchesne Clinic today,” said Sister Maureen Hall, SCL, community director.

In addition, three groups who continue to champion, dedicate and support the mission of Duchesne received appreciation plaques. They included the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth, Ladies of Charity of Metropolitan Kansa City and the Order of Malta.

“Stephen Ziller was one of the first people who heard the call from the Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth, and who took that call to heart,” Sister Maureen said. “Mr. Ziller, along with John Massman, John McMeel, Richard Miller and Robert Reintjes, rallied the Knights of Malta to make the vision of Duchesne Clinic a reality. It was wonderful to have his son, Stephen Ziller Jr., with us as we celebrated 25 years of service to the community.”

Amy Falk, executive director, said, “The clinic has an outstanding reputation and is a valued community partner. We strive to keep pace with advances in health care service delivery and are seeking recognition as a patient-centered medical home status with focus on the whole person and coordinated care. We are looking forward to the next 25 years of serving the Wyandotte community.”

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