Medalist Alex Forristal rallies KCKCC golfers to third

G. Alex Forristal (KCKCC photo)
G. Alex Forristal (KCKCC photo)

by Alan Hoskins

Led by co-medalist Alex Forristal, Kansas City Kansas Community College rallied to a third place finish in the 2014 William Woods University Golf Tournament in Fulton, Mo., Monday and Tuesday.

Four strokes back after an opening round one under par 71, Forristal rebounded with the tournament’s best round – a sizzling 6-under 66 – to overtake David Houlding of William Woods for co-medalist honors at 137.

A sophomore from Lenexa and Olathe East, Forristal’s big finish helped KCKCC vault from fifth to third place in the 9-team tournament made up of four-year colleges. With four of the top nine finishers, William Woods won the tournament going away with rounds of 279-286 for a 565 total. Culver-Stockton finished second at 287-293-580.

Fifth at 306 after one round, the Blue Devils were just one stroke back of William Woods for the low round of the second day’s play. Led by Forristal’s 66, a one-under 71 by Lane Pauls of Newton and an even par 72 by Seve Sites of Shawnee Mission West, the Blue Devils closed with a 287 for a 593 total. Southwestern College was fourth (594) followed by St. Xavier of Illinois (607), Hannibal LaGrange (626), Central Methodist (641), Haskell (647) and Westminster (759).

Pauls finished in a tie for 15th at 78-71-149 followed by Sites, who was 20th at 80-72-152; Charlie Rinehart of Piper, 29th at 78-78-156; and the lone freshman, Jeremy Dunham of Derby, 79-79-158.

The Blue Devils are now home for the annual Blue Devil Classic to be played Monday and Tuesday at Dub’s Dread.
Alan Hoskins is the sports information director at KCKCC.

KCKCC vocal music prepares for two concerts

by Kelly Rogge
The Kansas City Kansas Community College Vocal Music Department is inviting the community to support the college’s choirs during the upcoming GEMS concert.

The concert is at 5 p.m. Oct. 12 at St. Patrick Church, 1086 N. 94th St. in Kansas City, Kan. It is free and open to the public.

The concert will feature the Community Choir and the Chamber Chair as they perform works by Handel, Rutter, Mealor, Whitacre, Hogan and more. GEMS is a showcase of choral music (both well-known and unknown) from different countries and cultures. These countries include England, Russia, Germany and the United States.

John Stafford, choral director and professor at KCKCC, said the music performed at the concert are or will eventually become staples of the choral repertoire.

For more information on the choral program at KCKCC, contact John Stafford at jstafford@kckcc.edu or call 913-288-7137. To hear a live recording of KCKCC Chamber Choir visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=db6xtKW7IM4.

The KCKCC Music Department is also presenting “An Evening of Jazz” this week. The performance is at 6 p.m. Oct. 8 at the West Wyandotte Library, 1737 N. 82nd St. in Kansas City, Kan. The event is free and open to the public. The event will feature the Jazz Band, Latin Band, Little Big Band, Jazz Combos and the vocal jazz ensembles.

To see an instrumental music program promo, visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gp1V-3AMGXE.
– Story from KCKCC

KCKCC-TEC holds Manufacturing Day event

Students from five high schools in Kansas City, Kan. and Leavenworth had the opportunity to speak with manufacturing professionals who talked about their jobs during the 2014 Manufacturing Day event at KCKCC-TEC. (Photo from KCKCC)
Students from five high schools in Kansas City, Kan., and Leavenworth had the opportunity to speak with manufacturing professionals who talked about their jobs during the 2014 Manufacturing Day event at KCKCC-TEC. (Photo from KCKCC)

by Kelly Rogge
High school students from Kansas City, Kan., and Leavenworth spent some time recently learning about what types of manufacturing careers are available to them through Kansas City Kansas Community College’s Manufacturing Day.

The 2014 Manufacturing Day event was a first for KCKCC-TEC, which hosted it Oct. 2. Started three years ago as a grassroots initiative to overcome the challenges of finding skilled labor for manufacturers, the day is designed to address the public perception that careers in manufacturing are undesirable. Both of these problems stem from a lack of understanding of present-day manufacturing environments, which are highly technical. This event allows manufacturers to open their doors to show prospective employees what opportunities they have. This is a nationwide plan to continue to draw awareness to the manufacturing industry and to showcase the benefits of choosing a career in the field.

“One of the biggest challenges for manufacturers across the country is finding that skilled labor,” said Tiffany Stovall, representative with the Mid-America Manufacturing Technology Center in Kansas City. “This is a grassroots movement of manufacturers who are dedicated to address this shared challenge.”

Close to 100 students from five high schools – Wyandotte, Washington, Harmon and Schlagle high schools in Kansas City, Kan., as well as Leavenworth High School, attended the day-long event, hosted by KCKCC-TEC. Students had the opportunity to tour the General Motors Plant and A&E Custom Manufacturing, representing manufacturers on a large and small scale. They then had lunch with manufacturing professionals who talked about what their jobs are like and what students need to do to gain such employment. These positions included an engineer, machinist, CAD/Designer, welder, electrician, industrial maintenance and an assembler/fabricator. The day ended with a tour of several KCKCC-TEC programs including machine technology, HVAC, major appliance and welding, among others.

“This was a whole brand new experience for many of these students,” said Donna Shawn, director-Perkins coordinator at KCKCC-TEC. “What we were doing was really opening their world. As the boomers start retiring, there is really going to be a shortage of skilled labor. We want them to see that there are plenty of opportunities for them out there with the right education and training.”

KCKCC’s event was just one of dozens throughout the state of Kansas in October. Nationwide, more than 1,500 companies will be participating. The event is co-produced by the Fabricators and Manufacturers Association, International; the National Association of Manufacturers; the Manufacturing Institute, the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership and Industrial Strength Marketing.

“What we want is for students to be exposed to the variety of careers in manufacturing and begin considering the industry as a career path. These may be paths that they otherwise may not have considered,” she said. “As more people begin talking about this effort and how the manufacturing industry is hurting for skilled labors, I think there is more interest in events like Manufacturing Day. Manufacturing is screaming that they need help, and we are beginning to shape students’ visions of what kinds of opportunities there are out there for them.”

For more information on Manufacturing Day or to see other events occurring, visit www.mfgday.com. For more information on programs available at KCKCC-TEC that relate to manufacturing, visit the college’s website at www.kckcc.edu or call 913-288-7800.

Students from five high schools in Kansas City, Kan. and Leavenworth had the opportunity to speak with manufacturing professionals who talked about their jobs during the 2014 Manufacturing Day event at KCKCC-TEC. (Photo from KCKCC)
Students from five high schools in Kansas City, Kan. and Leavenworth had the opportunity to speak with manufacturing professionals who talked about their jobs during the 2014 Manufacturing Day event at KCKCC-TEC. (Photo from KCKCC)